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Български форум за дизайн
‘slim’ mosquito trap by martin zampach PDF Print E-mail
Written by Velikov   
Friday, 31 October 2008 14:43


czech designer martin zampach designed the ‘slim’ mosquito trap with pepe garcia while working at
the design studio culdesac in valencia, spain. the design aims to simplify the traditional trap and turn
it into a object users will be proud to display. the product uses electricity to zap the bugs and looks
more like a sleek radiator than a glowing bug trap.

http://martin.zampach.com

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'four nipples plate black' by martin zampach
tetris ice cubes




 
public art project by joshua callaghan PDF Print E-mail
Written by Velikov   
Friday, 31 October 2008 14:43


artist joshua callaghan has worked on a series of public art projects in addition to his sculptural installations.
the series uses digitally printed adhesive vinyl, which callaghan applies to urban infrastructure like electricity
boxes. the graphics on the vinyl depict the scene that is hidden behind. the project appears like a reflective
surface transforming what could blight the environment, into a piece of art. the vinyl is permanent and coated
with a special chemical to prevent graffiti.

http://www.joshuacallaghan.com

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joshua callaghan









photography by
misha de ridder
 
'hill house' by johnston marklee & associates PDF Print E-mail
Written by Velikov   
Friday, 31 October 2008 14:43


the ‘hill house’ by johnston marklee & associates sits on a downward slope in califonia’s pacific palisades.
the home was completed in 2004 and was strategically designed to meet the local building codes aimed at
preserving the hillside landscape and promoting safety. the home is designed to maximize volume while
limiting environmental impact. three floors have been arranged to create a spacious and harmonious interior.
the central floor is home the living space, and kitchen and dining rooms. above a semi-private loft space
looks over the main floor. the ground floor holds the bedrooms. the home features large sliding glass doors
on the main floor as well as a series of skylight openings. the home was built using concrete, steel and
timber and is coated in a special material that was coloured to match eucalyptus bark found on site.
the foundation is built on nine 35 ft. concrete pillars, which help support the building and make its
design possible.

http://www.johnstonmarklee.com















via arch daily
 
Core77 Photo Gallery : DesignPhiladelphia 2008 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Velikov   
Friday, 31 October 2008 14:37

DesignPhillyWrap.jpg

Our DesignPhiladelphia 2008 gallery is now online with images covering a full week of events in the city of brotherly love. Highlights include Philly Heart Design local designer exhibition, A Clean Break: Pop-up Neighborhood, Make:Philly Art Cart Derby, and many lectures and exhibitions. Enjoy!

>> View Gallery


View all DesignPhiladelphia 2008 posts:

>> DesignPhiladelphia 2008

>> DesignPhiladelphia 2008: SOS Stool by Josh Owen

>> DesignPhiladelphia 2008: Matthias Pliessnig

>> DesignPhiladelphia 2008: The Hacktory

>> DesignPhiladelphia 2008: Two Days Left

>> DesignPhiladelphia 2008: A Clean Break

>> DesignPhiladelphia 2008: Student Work at 222 Gallery

(more...)

 
UGLY: How Unorthodox Thinking Will Save Design, by Tad Toulis PDF Print E-mail
Written by Velikov   
Friday, 31 October 2008 14:37

UGLYaaa.jpg
Maarten Baas' 'Clay Furniture - Stacking Chairs'

Is 'Good Design' an asphyxiating dogma?
Design is a peculiar activity: It's a creative process, but a process that subscribes to and reinforces certain restrictive attitudes. It can be rigid and self-policing, since a profession that earns its living by discerning what is good and bad must necessarily become judgmental. Ultimately this judgmental nature creates and enshrines certain points of view, which left unchallenged, become dogma. Today, one could argue that this dogma, generally predicated on longstanding ideas of 'rightness' and 'beauty' is choking the profession down, and worse yet, stifling its creativity as it faces some truly great problems—problems which if handled with new thinking and true creativity, will define the substance, practice and contribution of a generation of designers.

Embracing the word "ugly"—so readily identified with everything popular design claims to have been a reaction against—seems a logical choice if we are to create a vision for the practice of design freed from the restrictions and prejudices of its past.


Pretty: Right priced beauty
But wait. Truth and beauty are good things, right? Not necessarily. Design's traditional preference on establishing 'order' has had the consequence of driving a collateral and unchecked pursuit of beauty. Beauty lies in the eye of the beholder, of course, and as such is subject to the vagaries of cultural bias and popular opinion. By degrees this pursuit of beauty has gradually been replaced with the much more predictable and less admirable accomplishment of achieving 'pretty'. And while consumer culture, planned obsolesce and design culture in general have benefited soundly from the creation, production and documentation of pretty things—the pursuit of pretty hasn't pushed the discipline of design into the tighter, less comfortable and ultimately more rigorous inquiries that outside forces (sustainability for example) are aligning to demand of us.

How might product designers better position the discipline to take on the hairy problems of sustainability, economic uncertainty, global competition and the like? Well, one thing is for certain, simply co-opting present patterns of consumption into activities and services linked to conservation won't get us there. That path might work if the world population of 6.5 billion was to stay fixed, but with an additional 3 billion consumers arriving to the party by 2050 we'll need to find more expedient (read: more creative) solutions.

UGLYb.jpg
Tjep's 'XXL Chair' and Front Design's 'Sketch Furniture'


PrettyUGLY: The case for 'UGLY' thinking in popular design
Whether attributable to a crisis of faith or economic malaise, High Design's recent fascination with the aesthetics of the unorthodox has given rise to some of the freshest design proposals of recent memory. It's too early to tell whether these musings signal a genuine turning point in the evolution of design, but the newfound acceptance of UGLY as a legitimate voice in design sets the stage for some interesting possibilities at a time when the profession faces deep challenges.

Longtime anathema of design circles, I'd like to suggest that design capitalize on UGLY's present arrival on the scene to boldly re-imagine itself and its future. Appropriating UGLY affords a latitude that would serve to liberate design and design thinking, expediting the introduction of new voices and ideas that might stimulate and revitalize the practice of design. Embracing a word so readily identified with everything popular design claims to have been a reaction against seems a logical choice if we are to create a vision for the practice of design freed from the restrictions and prejudices of its past.

(more...)

 
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